All posts by Deborah Lagutaris

The Ash Grove: REMINDER: Sunday’s Great Events: OPEN HOUSE at (CSPG) ~ IN MEMORIAM, JOHN LENNON

FacebookTwitterGoogle+LinkedInPinterestShare

REMINDER: Sunday’s Great Events: OPEN HOUSE at (CSPG) ~ IN MEMORIAM, JOHN LENNON

You Are Invited to An OPEN HOUSE At The Center For The Study Of Political Graphics Sunday, December 8th, 11:00 AM to 3:00 PM
Center For The Study of Political Graphics –

CSPG 3916 Sepulveda Blvd, Culver City 90230 – Suite 103

At The New Peace Center, Located Between Venice Blvd. & Washington Place, Adjacent to 405

Please Visit CSPG’s New Space!

Refreshments – Archive Tours – Holiday Shopping Parking in the Rear of the Building. For

More Information Call: 310- 397-3100 or Email: cspg@politicalgraphics.org (mailto:cspg@politicalgraphics.org) www.politicalgraphics.org (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=1eb4aa5f0a&e=5617d3d307)

With Over 80,000 Posters, the CSPG Archive is the Largest Collection of Post World War II Graphics in the United States. The Center for the Study of Political Graphics collects, preserves, and exhibits posters relating to historical and contemporary movements for social change. Through its varied programs, CSPG is reclaiming the power of art to educate and inspire people to action. There has never been a movement for social change without the arts—music, poetry, theater, posters–being central to that movement. Political posters in particular are powerful living reminders of struggles worldwide for peace and justice. Communication, exhortation, persuasion, instruction, celebration, warning: graphic art broadcasts its messages through bold images and striking designs. The archive contains more than 80,000 posters produced in a staggering array of visual styles and printing media, dating from the Russian Revolution to the present.

University, museum, and public collections of this material are rare, and are seldom accessible to the public. CSPG is uniquely committed to widely exhibiting this rich visual record of social movements. The Power of Poster Art All art is political, but not all art is overtly political. Protest posters flaunt their politics to generate controversy. Raw and aggressive or polished and sophisticated, political posters are the graphics of dissent from existing injustices.

Produced in multiples, often with urgency and any means available—offset, lithograph, silkscreen, linocut, stencil, woodcut, photocopy, or laser—few copies survive. Slapped on walls surreptitiously, often at great risk, by collectives and anonymous individuals or carefully fashioned by recognized artists in well-equipped studios, protest posters communicate instantly and directly to both literate and non-literate viewers. Like all art, political posters stir emotions and reflection. They can deepen compassion and commitment, ignite outrage, elicit laughter, and provoke action.

Transmitting and promoting the ideals, hopes, and dreams of millions who have dared to raise their voices in protest, political posters empower and propel diverse movements for social change.

Traveling & Virtual Exhibitions

Since the nineteenth century, posters have played an increasingly important role in public art. Because of their partisan content, they often have been neglected or destroyed. For this reason, CSPG’s timely traveling poster exhibitions are a unique resource. All exhibitions are presented from multi-issue and multicultural perspectives and come mounted and accompanied by translations, annotations, and other educational materials. The exhibitions illuminate and broaden understanding of diverse human-rights issues and movements past and present, including African-American, Asian, Chicano, Native American and Women’s rights; AIDS; anti-Semitism; Black Panther Party; Che Guevara and Latin America; ecology; globalization; gentrification and homelessness; immigration; liberation theology; political prisoners; racism, sexism and homophobia; protest in Los Angeles; the Viet Nam era; and the “war” against children.CSPG has more than two dozen traveling exhibitions (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=4d119f3f8b&e=5617d3d307) that are displayed in museums, galleries, libraries, community centers, schools, religious institutions, concert halls, theaters, and government buildings. Selected virtual exhibitions (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage.com/track/click?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=16b62f5b2e&e=5617d3d307) are also available through this website. Contextualizing and deepening understanding of the historical forces at the heart of social and political change, CSPG brings these moving and visually stunning graphics to a broad cross-section of the population. Customized exhibitions are also available.

Acquisition, Conservation and Research

With more than 80,000 posters, CSPG’s growing collection represents one of the most diverse and important visual resources in the nation, and is frequently used by artists, activists, scholars, students, filmmakers, and playwrights. The collection includes posters from over 100 countries. The posters are physically vulnerable markers of historical frontiers, international relations, and popular sentiment. The historical sweep of the collection makes conservation of these fragile graphic records of the utmost importance, and CSPG is committed to preserving the archive for future generations. In addition to posters donated by over 1000 individuals and organizations, CSPG’s collection includes the La Peña poster archive, the Fireworks Graphics poster archive, the Bob Fitch poster archive, the David Kunzle poster collection, and the Jill and Michael McCain Collection. The archive also collects buttons and bumper stickers.

CSPG is a non-profit, tax-exempt educational archive. All donations are tax-deductible.

CSPG Staff

Carol A. Wells Executive Director/Founder

Mary Sutton Program Director
Joy Novak Archivist
Bo Doub Project Archivist
Elvia Arroyo-Ramirez Project Archivist
Alena Barrios Administrative Assistant

www.politicalgraphics.org (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage.com/track/click?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=b7a2fa2880&e=5617d3d307) * * * greygoosemusic@aol.com (mailto:greygoosemusic@aol.com)

The Talking Stick Presents: In Memoriam John Lennon Sunday, December 8, 2013 7:30 to 9:30 PM—Free*

Hosted by Ross Altman
At The Talking Stick
1411 Lincoln Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 ((310) 450-6052

With Special Guests Paul Zollo, Jeff Gold, Robert Wayne Jill Fenimore and Esaú Alemán; Eric Ahlberg will be running the sound board. On December 8 in 1980 John Lennon’s life was ended by an assassin’s bullets in front of the Dakota, where he and his wife Yoko Ono lived. One of the great artists of the 20^th Century—both as a member of the Beatles and on his own—John & Yoko had moved to New York City to get away from the madness of England’s tabloid press, but he couldn’t escape the madness of America’s gun culture. It pursued him relentlessly—like it had President John F. Kennedy, Senator Robert F. Kennedy, Dr. Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Medgar Evers and, a hundred years earlier, President Abraham Lincoln. The songwriter who had imagined a world without war, greed and hunger, could not have imagined a world without crazed music fans whose admiration could so quickly turn to spiteful and vengeful hate. In the years since John Lennon was murdered his music has continued to fill the void in our lives, and on this 33^rd anniversary of his death we give thanks for his life and remember his musical and political legacy. On the 33^rd anniversary of his murder please join us at The Talking Stick to sing some of his great songs and reflect on America’s possession by the gun lobby controlled by the NRA* For John Lennon is not the only victim of its murderous tyranny or misinterpretation of the 2^nd Amendment. Just this year we have seen Trayvon Martin gunned down in Sanford, Florida, by a vigilante who since a clueless Florida jury acquitted him of murder has been in custody four additional times for acts of rage and the threat of gun-violence. Thank the NRA. In Aurora, Colorado a coward invaded a cultural temple—a movie theatre premiering the Dark Night Rises, third in the Batman series—and gunned down twelve innocent young audience members—whose own courage in the face of terror was itself inspiring. The lives they saved demonstrated that their deaths were not in vain. Thank the NRA. And in Newtown, Connecticut last Christmas yet another “mad man” (a term we seem to have resorted to in order to conceal the systematic hold the gun manufacturers have on Congress through the NRA) entered a classroom and gunned down 24 children and 4 teachers and administrators. We remember these as well—as both victims and heroes. Thank the NRA. * Free with one food and/or drink purchase to support the Talking Stick! Contact: Ross Altman (323) 931-9321 * © 2013 Grey Goose Music (BMI) * All Rights Reserved. * *The opinions expressed in this press release are those of the author Ross Altman and do not necessarily represent those of other participating artists or the host venue. ============================================================ ** follow on Twitter (Twitter%20Account%20not%20yet%20Authorized) ** forward to a friend (http://us7.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=fe03c5a089&e=5617d3d307) ** Add us to your address book (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage.com/vcard?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94) ** Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp (http://www.mailchimp.com/monkey-rewards/?utm_source=freemium_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=monkey_rewards&aid=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&afl=1) ** unsubscribe from this list (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage2.com/unsubscribe?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=5617d3d307&c=fe03c5a089) ** update subscription preferences (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage2.com/profile?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=5617d3d307) follow on Twitter (Twitter Account not yet Authorized ) | friend on Facebook (# ) | forward to a friend (http://us7.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=caae40716a&e=4f9ed2a7d1) Copyright © 2013 Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove, All rights reserved. A new format for The Ash Grove list! Hope you like it. Our mailing address is: Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove 882 Cleveland St. #21 Oakland, CA 94606 USA Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp http://www.mailchimp.com/monkey-rewards/?utm_source=freemium_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=monkey_rewards&aid=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&afl=1 unsubscribe from this list (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1&c=caae40716a) | update subscription preferences (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage.com/profile?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1)

The Ash Grove: BREAKING: Mandela Passes Away at 95

———————————————————— http://us7.campaign-archive1.com/?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=0d6586d290&e=4f9ed2a7d1 The Ash Grove BREAKING: Mandela Passes Away at 95 Nelson Mandela, died today at age 95. (photo: Joe Alexander/AFP/Getty Images) Nelson Mandela, died today at age 95. (photo: Joe Alexander/AFP/Getty Images) ** BREAKING: Mandela Passes Away at 95 ———————————————————— By David Smith, Guardian UK 05 December 13 “Death is something inevitable. When a man has done what he considers to be his duty to his people and his country, he can rest in peace” – Nelson Mandela Nelson Mandela led South Africa from apartheid to multi-racial democracy and will be mourned around the world. elson Mandela (http://www.theguardian.com/world/nelsonmandela) , the towering figure of Africa’s struggle for freedom and a hero to millions around the world, has died at the age of 95. South Africa’s first black president died after years of declining health that had caused him to withdraw from public life. The death of Mandela will send South Africa deep into mourning and self-reflection (http://madiba.mg.co.za/) 18 years after he led the country from racial apartheid to inclusive democracy. But his passing will also be keenly felt by people around the world who revered Mandela as one of history’s last great statesmen, and a moral paragon comparable with Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King. It was a transcendent act of forgiveness after spending 27 years in prison, 18 of them on Robben Island (http://www.robben-island.org.za/) , that will assure his place in history. With South Africa facing possible civil war, Mandela sought reconciliation with the white minority to build a new democracy. He led the African National Congress (ANC) to victory in the country’s first multiracial election in 1994. Unlike other African liberation leaders who cling to power (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204443404577054643814509000.html?mod=wsj_share_tweet) , such as Zimbabwe’s Robert Mugabe, he then voluntarily stepped down after one term. Mandela – often affectionately known by his clan name, Madiba – was awarded the Nobel peace prize in 1993. At his inauguration a year later, the new president said: “Never, never, and never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another … the sun shall never set on so glorious a human achievement. Let freedom reign. God bless Africa!” Born Rolihlahla Dalibhunga in a small village in the Eastern Cape on 18 July 1918, Mandela was given his English name, Nelson, by a teacher at his school. Mandela joined the ANC in 1943 and became a co-founder of its youth league. In 1952, he started South Africa’s first black law firm with his partner, Oliver Tambo. Mandela was a charming, charismatic figure with a passion for boxing – and an eye for women. He once said: “I can’t help it if the ladies take note of me. I am not going to protest.” He married his first wife, Evelyn Mase, in 1944. They were divorced in 1957 after having three children. In 1958, he married Winnie Madikizela, who later campaigned to free her husband from jail and became a key figure in the struggle. When the ANC was banned in 1960, Mandela went underground. After the Sharpeville massacre (http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2007/oct/18/southafrica.world) , in which 69 black protesters were shot dead by police, he took the difficult decision to launch an armed struggle. He was arrested and eventually charged with sabotage and attempting to violently overthrow the government. Conducting his own defence in the Rivonia Trial (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/1964/mar/01/nelsonmandela.southafrica) in 1964, he said: “I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. “It is an ideal which I hope to live for and to achieve. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.” He escaped the death penalty but was sentenced to life in prison, a huge blow to the ANC that had to regroup to continue the struggle. But unrest grew in townships and international pressure on the apartheid regime slowly tightened. Finally, in 1990, then president FW de Klerk lifted the ban on the ANC and Mandela was released from prison amid scenes of jubilation witnessed around the world (http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian/from-the-archive-blog/2011/jun/05/guardian190-mandela-is-freed) . In 1992, Mandela divorced Winnie after she was convicted on charges of kidnapping and accessory to assault. His presidency rode a wave of tremendous global goodwill but was not without its difficulties. After leaving frontline politics in 1999, he admitted he should have moved sooner against the spread of HIV/Aids. His son died from an Aids-related illness (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2002/aug/26/aids.nelsonmandela?INTCMP=ILCNETTXT3487) . On his 80th birthday, Mandela married Graça Machel, the widow of the former president of Mozambique. It was his third marriage. In total, he had six children, of whom three daughters survive: Pumla Makaziwe (Maki), Zenani and Zindziswa (Zindzi). He has 17 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. Mandela was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2001 and retired from public life, aged 85, to be with his family and enjoy some “quiet reflection”. But he remained a beloved and venerated figure with countless buildings, streets and squares named after him. His every move was scrutinised and his health was a constant source of media speculation (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/dec/15/mandela-house-cameras-media) . Mandela continued to make occasional appearances at ANC events and attended the inauguration of the current president, Jacob Zuma. His 91st birthday was marked by the first annual “Mandela Day” in his honour. He was last seen in public at the final of the 2010 World Cup in Johannesburg (http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/2010/jul/11/world-cup-final-nelson-mandela) , a tournament he had helped bring to South Africa for the first time. Early in 2011, he was taken to hospital in a health scare but he recovered and was visited by Michelle Obama and her daughters a few months later (http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/Michelle-Obama-visits-Mandela-20110621) . In January 2012, he was notably missing from theANC’s centenary celebrations (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jan/08/south-africa-anc-centenary) due to his frail condition. With other giants of the movement such as Tambo and Walter Sisulu having gone before Mandela, the defining chapter of Africa’s oldest liberation movement is now closed. ============================================================ Copyright © 2013 Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove, All rights reserved. A new format for The Ash Grove list! Hope you like it. Our mailing address is: Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove 882 Cleveland St. #21 Oakland, CA 94606 USA Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp http://www.mailchimp.com/monkey-rewards/?utm_source=freemium_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=monkey_rewards&aid=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&afl=1 ** follow on Twitter (Twitter Account not yet Authorized ) ** friend on Facebook (# ) ** forward to a friend (http://us7.forward-to-friend1.com/forward?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=0d6586d290&e=4f9ed2a7d1) ** unsubscribe from this list (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage1.com/unsubscribe?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1&c=0d6586d290) ** update subscription preferences (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage.com/profile?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1)

The Ash Grove: SUNDAY DOINGS: OPEN HOUSE at (CSPG) ~ IN MEMORIUM, JOHN LENNON

———————————————————— http://us7.campaign-archive2.com/?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=fe03c5a089&e=4f9ed2a7d1 The Ash Grove The Ash Grove: SUNDAY DOINGS: OPEN HOUSE at (CSPG) ~ IN MEMORIUM, JOHN LENNON From: Carol Wells [mailto:cwells@igc.org] Hi Ed, Could you e-blast this invite to our open house? Thanks, Carol You Are Invited to An OPEN HOUSE At The Center For The Study Of Political Graphics Sunday, December 8^th, 11:00 AM to 3:00 PM Center For The Study of Political Graphics – CSPG 3916 Sepulveda Blvd, Culver City 90230 – Suite 103 At The New Peace Center, Located Between Venice Blvd. & Washington Place, Adjacent to 405 Please Visit CSPG’s New Space! Refreshments – Archive Tours – Holiday Shopping Parking in the Rear of the Building. For More Information Call: 310- 397-3100 or Email: cspg@politicalgraphics.org (mailto:cspg@politicalgraphics.org) www.politicalgraphics.org With Over 80,000 Posters, the CSPG Archive is the Largest Collection of Post World War II Graphics in the United States. The Center for the Study of Political Graphics collects, preserves, and exhibits posters relating to historical and contemporary movements for social change. Through its varied programs, CSPG is reclaiming the power of art to educate and inspire people to action. There has never been a movement for social change without the arts—music, poetry, theater, posters–being central to that movement. Political posters in particular are powerful living reminders of struggles worldwide for peace and justice. Communication, exhortation, persuasion, instruction, celebration, warning: graphic art broadcasts its messages through bold images and striking designs. The archive contains more than 80,000 posters produced in a staggering array of visual styles and printing media, dating from the Russian Revolution to the present. University, museum, and public collections of this material are rare, and are seldom accessible to the public. CSPG is uniquely committed to widely exhibiting this rich visual record of social movements. The Power of Poster Art All art is political, but not all art is overtly political. Protest posters flaunt their politics to generate controversy. Raw and aggressive or polished and sophisticated, political posters are the graphics of dissent from existing injustices. Produced in multiples, often with urgency and any means available—offset, lithograph, silkscreen, linocut, stencil, woodcut, photocopy, or laser—few copies survive. Slapped on walls surreptitiously, often at great risk, by collectives and anonymous individuals or carefully fashioned by recognized artists in well-equipped studios, protest posters communicate instantly and directly to both literate and non-literate viewers. Like all art, political posters stir emotions and reflection. They can deepen compassion and commitment, ignite outrage, elicit laughter, and provoke action. Transmitting and promoting the ideals, hopes, and dreams of millions who have dared to raise their voices in protest, political posters empower and propel diverse movements for social change. Traveling & Virtual Exhibitions Since the nineteenth century, posters have played an increasingly important role in public art. Because of their partisan content, they often have been neglected or destroyed. For this reason, CSPG’s timely traveling poster exhibitions are a unique resource. All exhibitions are presented from multi-issue and multicultural perspectives and come mounted and accompanied by translations, annotations, and other educational materials. The exhibitions illuminate and broaden understanding of diverse human-rights issues and movements past and present, including African-American, Asian, Chicano, Native American and Women’s rights; AIDS; anti-Semitism; Black Panther Party; Che Guevara and Latin America; ecology; globalization; gentrification and homelessness; immigration; liberation theology; political prisoners; racism, sexism and homophobia; protest in Los Angeles; the Viet Nam era; and the “war” against children.CSPG has more than two dozen traveling exhibitions (http://www.politicalgraphics.org/exhibitions.html) that are displayed in museums, galleries, libraries, community centers, schools, religious institutions, concert halls, theaters, and government buildings. Selected virtual exhibitions (http://www.politicalgraphics.org/exhibitions.html) are also available through this website. Contextualizing and deepening understanding of the historical forces at the heart of social and political change, CSPG brings these moving and visually stunning graphics to a broad cross-section of the population. Customized exhibitions are also available. Acquisition, Conservation and Research With more than 80,000 posters, CSPG’s growing collection represents one of the most diverse and important visual resources in the nation, and is frequently used by artists, activists, scholars, students, filmmakers, and playwrights. The collection includes posters from over 100 countries. The posters are physically vulnerable markers of historical frontiers, international relations, and popular sentiment. The historical sweep of the collection makes conservation of these fragile graphic records of the utmost importance, and CSPG is committed to preserving the archive for future generations. In addition to posters donated by over 1000 individuals and organizations, CSPG’s collection includes the La Peña poster archive, the Fireworks Graphics poster archive, the Bob Fitch poster archive, the David Kunzle poster collection, and the Jill and Michael McCain Collection. The archive also collects buttons and bumper stickers. CSPG is a non-profit, tax-exempt educational archive. All donations are tax-deductible. CSPG Staff Carol A. Wells Executive Director/Founder Mary Sutton Program Director Joy Novak Archivist Bo Doub Project Archivist Elvia Arroyo-Ramirez Project Archivist Alena Barrios Administrative Assistant www.politicalgraphics.org * * * greygoosemusic@aol.com (mailto:greygoosemusic@aol.com) The Talking Stick Presents: In Memoriam John Lennon Sunday, December 8, 2013 7:30 to 9:30 PM—Free* Hosted by Ross Altman At The Talking Stick 1411 Lincoln Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 ((310) 450-6052 With Special Guests Paul Zollo, Jeff Gold, Robert Wayne Jill Fenimore and Esaú Alemán; Eric Ahlberg will be running the sound board. On December 8 in 1980 John Lennon’s life was ended by an assassin’s bullets in front of the Dakota, where he and his wife Yoko Ono lived. One of the great artists of the 20^th Century—both as a member of the Beatles and on his own—John & Yoko had moved to New York City to get away from the madness of England’s tabloid press, but he couldn’t escape the madness of America’s gun culture. It pursued him relentlessly—like it had President John F. Kennedy, Senator Robert F. Kennedy, Dr. Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Medgar Evers and, a hundred years earlier, President Abraham Lincoln. The songwriter who had imagined a world without war, greed and hunger, could not have imagined a world without crazed music fans whose admiration could so quickly turn to spiteful and vengeful hate. In the years since John Lennon was murdered his music has continued to fill the void in our lives, and on this 33^rd anniversary of his death we give thanks for his life and remember his musical and political legacy. On the 33^rd anniversary of his murder please join us at The Talking Stick to sing some of his great songs and reflect on America’s possession by the gun lobby controlled by the NRA* For John Lennon is not the only victim of its murderous tyranny or misinterpretation of the 2^nd Amendment. Just this year we have seen Trayvon Martin gunned down in Sanford, Florida, by a vigilante who since a clueless Florida jury acquitted him of murder has been in custody four additional times for acts of rage and the threat of gun-violence. Thank the NRA. In Aurora, Colorado a coward invaded a cultural temple—a movie theatre premiering the Dark Night Rises, third in the Batman series—and gunned down twelve innocent young audience members—whose own courage in the face of terror was itself inspiring. The lives they saved demonstrated that their deaths were not in vain. Thank the NRA. And in Newtown, Connecticut last Christmas yet another “mad man” (a term we seem to have resorted to in order to conceal the systematic hold the gun manufacturers have on Congress through the NRA) entered a classroom and gunned down 24 children and 4 teachers and administrators. We remember these as well—as both victims and heroes. Thank the NRA. * Free with one food and/or drink purchase to support the Talking Stick! Contact: Ross Altman (323) 931-9321 * © 2013 Grey Goose Music (BMI) * All Rights Reserved. * *The opinions expressed in this press release are those of the author Ross Altman and do not necessarily represent those of other participating artists or the host venue. ============================================================ Copyright © 2013 Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove, All rights reserved. A new format for The Ash Grove list! Hope you like it. Our mailing address is: Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove 882 Cleveland St. #21 Oakland, CA 94606 USA Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp http://www.mailchimp.com/monkey-rewards/?utm_source=freemium_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=monkey_rewards&aid=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&afl=1 ** follow on Twitter (Twitter Account not yet Authorized ) ** friend on Facebook (# ) ** forward to a friend (http://us7.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=fe03c5a089&e=4f9ed2a7d1) ** unsubscribe from this list (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage2.com/unsubscribe?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1&c=fe03c5a089) ** update subscription preferences (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage2.com/profile?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1)

“Amandla! A Revolution in four part harmony.”

Ed, I’ve not seen the film yet. I only know that it’s a documentary about the music of the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa. Just as music played an important role in the civil rights movement here, apparently so did it in the struggle for freedom over there,

The film is called “Amandla! A Revolution in four part harmony.”

Here’s a link to the reviews it has received.

http://www.amazon.com/Amandla-A-Revolution-Four-Part-Harmony/product-reviews/B0000C2IWO/ref=dp_db_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1

(From November 30) The film will be shown Sunday morning at 5:45 AM on one of the channels on the Starz network. (Channel 578 on Time Warner cable.) I think many of the people on your mailing list will be interested in seeing it. I’ve already set my DVR to record it.

Mike

*HAPPY HANUKKAH!*

———————————————————— http://us7.campaign-archive2.com/?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=9db67c1113&e=4f9ed2a7d1 Ash Grove Music *HAPPY HANUKKAH!* Alison On Wed, Nov 27, 2013 at 10:45 PM, Greg Dempsey wrote: ** ———————————————————— http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/27/hanukkah-2013-dates-rituals-history_n_4351654.html?utm_hp_ref=religion *HAPPY HANUKKAH!* Hanukkah, the Jewish Festival of Lights, is celebrated for eight days beginning at sundown on Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013. On the Hebrew calendar, the dates are 25 Kislev to 2 Tevet in the year 5774. An eight-day celebration, Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in the second century B.C.E. during the Maccabean revolt against oppressive Greek rulers. It is one of the most widely observed Jewish holidays and is celebrated by lighting a nine-branch candelabrum, commonly called a menorah. (Technically, the candelabrum for Hanukkah is called a hanukkiah to distinguish itself from the seven-branch menorah used in the Temple and described in Exodus 25.) – Huffington Post Chag Sameach! Greg __._,_.___ Reply via web post (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SECULARHUMANIST/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJzM3FkaGRiBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE0MjMwNzM0BGdycHNwSWQDMTcwNTA4Mzc2NARtc2dJZAMzODU1NjcEc2VjA2Z0cgRzbGsDcnBseQRzdGltZQMxMzg1NjE0NTAy?act=reply&messageNum=385567) Reply to sender (mailto:rredford112@gmail.com?subject=Re%3A%20%5BSECULARHUMANIST%5D%20%2AHAPPY%20HANUKKAH%21%2A) Reply to group (mailto:SECULARHUMANIST@yahoogroups.com?subject=Re%3A%20%5BSECULARHUMANIST%5D%20%2AHAPPY%20HANUKKAH%21%2A) Start a New Topic (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SECULARHUMANIST/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJmdGoxbXFrBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE0MjMwNzM0BGdycHNwSWQDMTcwNTA4Mzc2NARzZWMDZnRyBHNsawNudHBjBHN0aW1lAzEzODU2MTQ1MDI-) Messages in this topic (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SECULARHUMANIST/message/385566;_ylc=X3oDMTM5dmc2NW5iBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE0MjMwNzM0BGdycHNwSWQDMTcwNTA4Mzc2NARtc2dJZAMzODU1NjcEc2VjA2Z0cgRzbGsDdnRwYwRzdGltZQMxMzg1NjE0NTAyBHRwY0lkAzM4NTU2Ng–) (2) Recent Activity: Visit Your Group (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SECULARHUMANIST;_ylc=X3oDMTJmYm9qdm90BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE0MjMwNzM0BGdycHNwSWQDMTcwNTA4Mzc2NARzZWMDdnRsBHNsawN2Z2hwBHN0aW1lAzEzODU2MTQ1MDI-) http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SECULARHUMANIST – Voice of the People http://groups.yahoo.com/;_ylc=X3oDMTJldW52MWZ2BF9TAzk3NDc2NTkwBGdycElkAzE0MjMwNzM0BGdycHNwSWQDMTcwNTA4Mzc2NARzZWMDZnRyBHNsawNnZnAEc3RpbWUDMTM4NTYxNDUwMg– Switch to: Text-Only (mailto:SECULARHUMANIST-traditional@yahoogroups.com?subject=Change Delivery Format: Traditional) , Daily Digest (mailto:SECULARHUMANIST-digest@yahoogroups.com?subject=Email Delivery: Digest) • Unsubscribe (mailto:SECULARHUMANIST-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe) • Terms of Use (http://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/) • Send us Feedback (mailto:ygroupsnotifications@yahoogroups.com?subject=Feedback on the redesigned individual mail v1) . __,_._,___ ============================================================ Copyright © 2013 Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove, All rights reserved. A new format for The Ash Grove list! Hope you like it. Our mailing address is: Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove 882 Cleveland St. #21 Oakland, CA 94606 USA Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp http://www.mailchimp.com/monkey-rewards/?utm_source=freemium_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=monkey_rewards&aid=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&afl=1 ** follow on Twitter (Twitter Account not yet Authorized ) ** friend on Facebook (# ) ** forward to a friend (http://us7.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=9db67c1113&e=4f9ed2a7d1) ** unsubscribe from this list (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1&c=9db67c1113) ** update subscription preferences (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage1.com/profile?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1)

Wanda Coleman, Watts native, dies at age 67, L.A.’s poet laureate

Wanda Coleman dies at 67; Watts native, L.A.’s unofficial poet laureate

During four decades as a force on the L.A. poetry scene, Coleman produced works that compelled attention to racism and hatred. Among Coleman’s best-known works was “Bathwater Wine” (1998), which brought her the Lenore Marshall National Poetry Prize from the Academy of American Poets in 1999. 1/6

Los Angeles Times:By Elaine Woo November 24, 2013,

With her dark skin and “unconkable kinky hair,” Wanda Coleman found growing up in Los Angeles in the 1950s often felt like torture. “The stultifying intellectual loneliness of my 1950s and ’60s upbringing was dictated by my looks,” she wrote years later. “Boys gawked at me, and girls tittered behind my back. Black teachers shook their heads in pity, and White teachers stared in amusement or in wonder.” Books became her precious refuge but were hard to come by because the libraries, she noted, “discouraged Negro readers.”

Such trials could grind any person down, but for Coleman they became a vital source for poetry that compelled attention to racism and hatred — the themes that most drove her to transcend the barriers of her birth and take her place as one of the city’s most perceptive writers.

A native of Watts who long was regarded as L.A.’s unofficial poet laureate, Coleman died Friday at after a long illness, said her husband, poet Austin Straus. She was 67. During four decades as a force on the Los Angeles poetry scene, Coleman wrote more than 20 books, including novels and collections of short stories and essays. She was most eloquent in poems, illuminating the ironies and despair in a poor black woman’s daily struggle for dignity but also writing tenderly and with humor about identity, tangled love, California winters and her working-class parents.

“She wrote not just about the black experience in Los Angeles but the whole configuration of Los Angeles in terms of its politics, its social life,” said Richard Modiano, executive director of Beyond Baroque, the Venice literary center where Coleman gave powerful readings. “I would call her a world-class poet. The range of her poetry and the voice she writes in is accessible to all sorts of people.”

Among Coleman’s best-known works was “Bathwater Wine” (1998), which brought her the from the Academy of American Poets in 1999. Her next volume, “Mercurochrome” (2001), was a finalist for the National Book Award, whose judges said, “Coleman’s poetry stings, stains and ultimately helps heal wounds” of racial injustice and gender inequality. Opinionated and fiercely individualistic, Coleman was also a critic and former columnist for The Times, whose of celebrated author ‘s “A Song Flung Up to Heaven” — one in a series of follow-ups to “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” — caused a tempest in the world of letters. Coleman panned the memoir as “a sloppily written fake” conceived to satisfy commercial rather than aesthetic tastes.

Her harsh attack on the iconic black writer drew national media coverage and led the African American owner of the specialty bookshop Esowon to ban Coleman from his store. But she remained unbowed. “Others often use the word ‘uncompromising’ to describe my work,” she told Contemporary Poets in 2001. “I find that quite pleasing.” Born in Los Angeles on Nov. 13, 1946, Coleman was the daughter of George and Lewana Evans. Her father was an ex-boxer who ran a Central Avenue sign shop by day and mopped floors as a janitor by night. Her mother was a seamstress and housekeeper who sometimes worked for Hollywood stars such as . Both parents nurtured a love for books and music, which helped soothe the pain of prejudice, uncaring teachers and the cruelties of peers.

Many of her poems burned with remembered insults and injustices, as in “Chapter 2 of the Story” from which describes her experiences with a librarian whose bifocals “magnified the bigotry in her eyes.” her gray eyes policed me thru the stacks like Dobermans she watched me come and go, take books and bring books she monitored the titles and after a while decided she’d misjudged her little colored girl and for a time she tried to apologize in her way. to engage in small talk. i never answered back. once, she set special books aside to gain my trust respect smile i left them untouched hating her more for that. Coleman attended Los Angeles Valley College and Cal State Los Angeles but did not earn a degree. By 20 she was married and the mother of two children, whom she supported after divorcing her first husband in 1969.

To get by, she held a series of low-paying jobs, including typist, waitress and recruiter. In the early 1970s she embarked on a journalism career with an assignment from the Los Angeles Free Press to write about a fundraiser for Black Panther supporter Angela Davis. But her sarcastic coverage caused consternation in the Davis camp, and she was blackballed by the underground paper for a decade. In 1975 she landed a job writing for the NBC soap opera “Days of Our Lives” and the next year won a daytime Emmy for her work. The strains of working and raising a family left her little time for other writing, which led her to focus on poetry. She took writing workshops around Los Angeles, including novelist Budd Schulberg’s Watts Writers Workshop, Studio Watts and the program at . Her evolution as a writer was painful.

“After peaking at 3,000 rejection slips by 1969,” she wrote in ” a 2005 collection of poetry and prose, “I had concluded that I was doing something very wrong no matter how closely I followed Writer’s Digest.” Things began to go right after she connected with the prestigious Black Press, which in 1977 published her first book of poetry, “Art in the Court of the Blue Fag.” Later collections include “Mad Dog, Black Lady” (1979) and “Imagoes” (1983), which won Coleman a National Endowment for the Arts grant and a Guggenheim Fellowship for Poetry; “Heavy Daughter Blues” (1987), which included fiction; “American Sonnets” (1994); and “Ostinato Vamps” (2005).

“Bathwater Wine,” the volume that brought Coleman national recognition, was highly autobiographical, with raw, eloquent paeans to her hardworking parents and a sister who died in infancy as well as wry commentaries on social phenomena like white flight. The poems are set in an urban landscape often recognizable as Los Angeles, as in “Closing Time,” about a bone-tired waitress heading for her car “at Trinity & Santa Barbara/the last clunker on the black top is mine,” and in “Toti’s Bowl,” a nostalgic tour of past and present haunts, including MacArthur Park, a Szechuan restaurant called Fu Ling’s and Harold & Belle’s on Jefferson Boulevard “for some bread pudding with whiskey sauce/and a patch of peach cobbler.” Other poems are steeped in her personal struggles for survival, as in “Gone Exits” from “Ostinato Vamps,” in which she spoke of “living on nothing but tea leaves and jeremiads/an unsteady diet for the inky mind.”

Her struggle for recognition may have fueled the jeremiad on the commercially successful Angelou, whose work Coleman slammed in the 2002 review as “one more traipse to the trough.” Coleman described herself in “The Riot Inside Me” as “just one more poet and writer struggling on the cultural margins of The West.” Los Angeles , who knew Coleman since the late 1960s, recalled that she once said at a reading she “had three strikes against her: She was a woman, black and from L.A. She mined that outlook a lot, but the truth is that she has done extremely well.”

She gave electrifying readings, sharing the stage over the years with luminaries such as Alice Coltrane, Allen Ginsberg, Timothy Leary, Los Lobos and Bonnie Raitt. “Her poems had a hot, jazzy, quality — and she delivered them like improvisational riffs,” poet and teacher Suzanne Lummis said Saturday. “There was no one quite like her, and no one can replace her.” In 2012 Coleman received the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America, which called her “one of the major writers of her generation.”

Married for more than 30 years to Straus, with whom she wrote a book of love poems coming out next year, she also is survived by two children, Tunisia Ordoñez and Ian Grant; brothers George Evans and Marvin Evans; sister Sharon Evans; and three grandchildren. Northup said age and accolades made Coleman “more serene and kind,” a mind-set reflected in a later poem, “Southerly Equinox.”

who am i? what am i? are no longer important questions. knowing that i am is finally enough like discovering dessert is delicious following a disastrous meal, a sweetness that reawakens the palate, or finding that one’s chalice is unexpectedly filled with elixir of euphoria and i stumble happily into the cornucopia, arms outstretched, upturned, drunk my heart athrum, bones full samba. the night blesses me with his constellations baptizes me with his deathless autumnal chill and i invade the moody indigo full-throated and singing

The Ash Grove: JFK: The 50th Anniversary Concert

———————————————————— http://us7.campaign-archive1.com/?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=a31b04991d&e=4f9ed2a7d1 Ash Grove Music JFK: The 50th Anniversary Concert The Talking Stick Coffee Lounge Is Proud to Present JFK: The 50^th Anniversary Concert In observance of November 22, 1963 Hosted by Ross Altman At the Talking Stick Coffee Lounge 1411 Lincoln Blvd., Venice, CA 90291 (310) 450-6052 November 22, 2013 7:00 to 10:00 PM With special guests poet Sherman Pearl, finger-style guitarist Jill Fenimore, storyteller Martha Stevens, psychiatrist/musician Dr. Neil Hartman, blues musician Alex “Alejandro” Soschin, and Change-Links Editor John Johnson the evening promises to be informative, inspiring and entertaining. Ash Grove alumnus and Venice Arts Council Webmaster Eric Ahlberg will be running the sound board. From “Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country” to That Dallas Morning on November 22, 1963, In Memoriam JFK looks back on the major themes and events of President Kennedy’s Thousand Days in office, using songs, poems and a prose narrative to tell the story of a time that is indelibly etched in history books and personal memory of everyone who lived through it. Hosted by Los Angeles folk singer Ross Altman on the 50^th anniversary, Friday evening November 22 7:00 to 10:00 PM at The Talking Stick Coffee Lounge, 1411 Lincoln Blvd. in Venice, CA 90291 (310) 450-6052; this event is free and open to the public. One drink or food purchase minimum to support the Talking Stick! *** *** *** *** *** *** *** JFK: The 50^th Anniversary Concert is a © production of Grey Goose Music (BMI); All Rights Reserved Contact: Ross Altman (323) 931-9321; Greygoosemusic@aol.com (mailto:Greygoosemusic@aol.com) ============================================================ Copyright © 2013 Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove, All rights reserved. A new format for The Ash Grove list! Hope you like it. Our mailing address is: Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove 882 Cleveland St. #21 Oakland, CA 94606 USA Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp http://www.mailchimp.com/monkey-rewards/?utm_source=freemium_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=monkey_rewards&aid=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&afl=1 ** follow on Twitter (Twitter Account not yet Authorized ) ** friend on Facebook (# ) ** forward to a friend (http://us7.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=a31b04991d&e=4f9ed2a7d1) ** unsubscribe from this list (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1&c=a31b04991d) ** update subscription preferences (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage2.com/profile?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1)

Stand with the Philippines

———————————————————— http://us7.campaign-archive1.com/?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=90dc0bee70&e=4f9ed2a7d1 The Ash Grove Stand with the Philippines From: Ricken Patel – Avaaz.org [avaaz@avaaz.org] Stand with the Phillippines Dear friends, http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/Stand_with_the_Philippines/?bfjOAfb&v=31098 The worst storm in history has devastated the people of the Philippines, and scientists say climate change fueled it. Leaders are meeting right now to decide whether to pay billions promised to help vulnerable countries recover from and protect against these climate disasters. Money that could go directly to helping the Philippines rebuild. The Filipino negotiator just went on a hunger strike for action and has started a petition on Avaaz — let’s stand with him: http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/Stand_with_the_Philippines/?bfjOAfb&v=31098 The horror of what’s happened in the Philippines is unimaginable. Ten thousand people wiped away by a 25ft wall of water driven by 300km/h winds. A city of 200,000 people looks like a nuclear bomb hit it. It’s the worst storm on record, but it’s just the beginning, unless we act. Right now the world’s powers are in a global climate conference talking about whether to hand over billions promised to help the most vulnerable amongst us when climate change disasters hit. Yeb Sano, the Philippines’ chief negotiator, just addressed the room, tearfully pledging a hunger strike until a real deal is reached to help his family, fellow citizens and all the other most vulnerable nations who are at the most risk for violent storms like this one. Yeb is standing alone, facing a room of bureaucrats who are doing almost nothing to help. But if we bring the power of our 29 million strong community in to stand with him, we could change the tide and push the richest polluters to pay up now. Click below to make it happen: http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/Stand_with_the_Philippines/?bfjOAfb&v=31098 (http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/Stand_with_the_Philippines/?bfjOAfb&v=31098) Yeb Sano, the climate negotiator for the Philippines, spent hours trying to reach his brother after the storm. He finally found him, part of a crew moving the bodies of victims so relief workers could begin cleanup. After hearing the news he gave an amazingly brave speech to the world’s climate delegates, saying: “I speak for my delegation. But more than that, I speak for the countless people who will no longer be able to speak for themselves after perishing from the storm. I also speak for those who have been orphaned by this tragedy. I also speak for the people now racing against time to save survivors and alleviate the suffering of the people affected by the disaster. We can take drastic action now to ensure that we prevent a future where super typhoons are a way of life… What my country is going through as a result of this extreme climate event is madness. The climate crisis is madness. We can stop this madness. Right here in Warsaw.” We owe it to the victims of Haiyan, and all future storms like it, to think bigger picture than our leaders are. Climate change killed them. And climate change is what we need to stop. A greater commitment to fund climate change management efforts is a key piece in the global deal we desperately need to save the world. And the richest countries have already pledged millions for this effort! So far, almost none of the money promised has arrived, but this can and must change. And the tragedy of the Philippines right in the middle of the climate conference is our chance to make it happen. Click below to stand with Yeb and his country and with all those who have been and could be victims of climate change disasters: http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/Stand_with_the_Philippines/?bfjOAfb&v=31098 (http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/Stand_with_the_Philippines/?bfjOAfb&v=31098) Yeb ended his speech by writing a pledge to everyone: “In solidarity with my countrymen who are struggling to find food back home and with my brother who has not had food for the last three days, in all due respect Mr. President, and I mean no disrespect for your kind hospitality, I will now commence a voluntary fasting for the climate. This means I will voluntarily refrain from eating food during this COP until a meaningful outcome is in sight.” Together, our movement can rise to this challenge, and bring hope to him and his family and generations of our most vulnerable world citizens. With hope and determination, Ricken and the whole Avaaz team PS – This campaign was started by Yeb Sano, chief climate negotiator for the Philippines. Start yours now and win on any issue – local, national or global: http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/start_a_petition/ (http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/start_a_petition/?bgMYedb&v=23917) More information: In hard-hit Tacloban, children ripped from arms (CNN) http://edition.cnn.com/2013/11/09/world/asia/philippines-tacloban/index.html Typhoon Haiyan: what really alarms Filipinos is the rich world ignoring climate change (The Guardian) http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/nov/08/typhoon-haiyan-rich-ignore-climate-change Typhoon Haiyan influenced by climate change, scientists say (Sydney Morning Herald) http://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/typhoon-haiyan-influenced-by-climate-change-scientists-say-20131111-2xb35.html Typhoon Haiyan: Philippines destruction ‘absolute bedlam’ (BBC) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-24894529 Deadly Typhoon Haiyan Devastates the Philippines, Heads for Vietnam (TIME) http://world.time.com/2013/11/10/deadly-typhoon-haiyan-devastates-the-philippines-heads-for-vietnam/ Right-click here to download pictures. To help protect your privacy, Outlook prevented automatic download of this picture from the Internet. ———————————————————— Avaaz.org is a 29-million-person global campaign network that works to ensure that the views and values of the world’s people shape global decision-making. (“Avaaz” means “voice” or “song” in many languages.) Avaaz members live in every nation of the world; our team is spread across 18 countries on 6 continents and operates in 17 languages. Learn about some of Avaaz’s biggest campaigns here (http://www.avaaz.org/en/highlights.php/?footer) , or follow us on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/Avaaz) or Twitter (http://twitter.com/Avaaz) . You are getting this message because you signed “Community Petitions Site (http://www.avaaz.org/en/distributed_organizing_signers) ” on 2013-09-25 using the email address epearlag@att.net. To ensure that Avaaz messages reach your inbox, please add avaaz@avaaz.org to your address book. To change your email address, language settings, or other personal information, contact us (http://www.avaaz.org/en/contact/?footer) , or simply go here to unsubscribe (epearlag@att.net&b=2616&v=31098?=en)” >https://secure.avaaz.org/act/?r=unsub&cl=3544391151&email=epearlag@att.net&b=2616&v=31098?=en) . To contact Avaaz, please do not reply to this email. Instead, write to us at www.avaaz.org/en/contact (http://www.avaaz.org/en/contact?footer) or call us at +1-888-922-8229 (US). ============================================================ Copyright © 2013 Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove, All rights reserved. A new format for The Ash Grove list! Hope you like it. Our mailing address is: Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove 882 Cleveland St. #21 Oakland, CA 94606 USA Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp http://www.mailchimp.com/monkey-rewards/?utm_source=freemium_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=monkey_rewards&aid=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&afl=1 ** follow on Twitter (Twitter Account not yet Authorized ) ** friend on Facebook (# ) ** forward to a friend (http://us7.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=90dc0bee70&e=4f9ed2a7d1) ** unsubscribe from this list (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage1.com/unsubscribe?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1&c=90dc0bee70) ** update subscription preferences (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage2.com/profile?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1)

David McReynolds: We Are All Wounded Veterans

———————————————————— http://us7.campaign-archive1.com/?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=e79b3cf159&e=4f9ed2a7d1 Ash Grove David McReynolds: We Are All Wounded Veterans EdgeLeft: We Are All Wounded Veterans by David McReynolds (Edgeleft is an occasional column which may be used without further permission) There is something infinitely sad and even repellent about the current celebration of Veterans Day. This was once Armistice Day, the observation of the 11th minute of the 11th hour of the 11th day in November, 1918 when the guns fell silent and the great war ended. The war to end all wars. There is certainly a difference between those veterans who survived a war in defense of their country, and those who took part in a war of aggression. Whatever pacifists may feel about war, there was a purpose for those in the Allied forces in World War II who were defending their countries after they had been attacked. Sadly, this cannot be said about the wars in Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan. The whole veteran thing is complex. War, for those who actually experienced it – who didn’t serve their time at a supply base – is hell. I remember, as a child, wondering how any man could get out of the trenches and walk through a field of death with sounds beyond thunder bursting all around. I still don’t know. I only know I would never have the courage to do it. My father, when a visiting pastor at our church assured the men in the congregation who had served in the military that they need not feel burdened by a sense of guilt over what they might have done, since they had only carried out orders from the State, took the pastor aside after the service and, with barely controlled fury, said “Don’t you dare tell me that I am not guilty for what I did. I did it because I didn’t know what else to do, and only the blood of the Lord Jesus Christ can redeem me for the sins of violence”. Even in the best of good wars what of the men on the losing side, who suffered the same horrors but had no brass bands to welcome them home, no mayors and pastors to bless them? The Nazi side was criminal, but the soldiers in their army – and in the Japanese army – fought with courage and returned home to ruins. What can we say of those wars in which we had no real national interest? The Vietnamese did not attack us, Iraq posed no national threat, nor did the Afghans. Our men and women fought because they were ordered to. Some – a very small handful of them – enjoyed the violence. Most were terrified or brutalized by it. Most of all, what I think of on this day, is that, with the miracle of modern medicine, the men and women who, in other wars would have died from their wounds, now survive, and return without all of their limbs, missing parts of their faces, or brains, facing a life ahead of them of physical therapy. It is one thing for me, at 84, to remind myself that, if I want to ease the pains of walking, I need to do prescribed exercises. But how unfair that these youth, who should be returning home to run, to play baseball with their children, to make love with vigor, must instead adjust to artificial arms and legs, to endless painful hours of physical therapy. Those who saw combat do not return whole. Their dreams reek of death, of comrades torn apart, of foreign children shot by accident. And we do nothing at all to bring to justice those who sent these men and women into wars which were, in a fundamental sense, unjust. And even in the good wars there is still the memory of an enemy who, in death, turned out to be only an adolescent. In the bad wars – which are the only wars we have fought for some time now – there is the terrible knowledge that the enemy was never really the enemy. That if there is an enemy it is the government that asks us to celebrate the service of the veterans. Let us honor the veterans – all of them, of any nationality. But remember also that in these wars there are other veterans whose fate is not mentioned by Obama, the mothers in Iraq, the wives in Vietnam, the children in Afghanistan, and all the wounded in distant lands, for whom there is no modern medical science. Only dust, blood and pain. So our goal, and a goal I suspect I share with a great many veterans, is to work for a world where there are no new veterans and where, perhaps to diminish the chance of such wars, we bring to justice those who so lightly send our young into foreign lands. (Edgeleft is written by David McReynolds, who was on the staff of War Resisters League for many years, and was twice the Socialist Party’s candidate for President. He is retired, and lives on Manhattan’s Lower East Side with his two cats. He can be reached at: davidmcreynolds7@gmail.com (mailto:davidmcreynolds7@gmail.com) . His writings can be found on his website: Edgeleft.org) . ============================================================ Copyright © 2013 Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove, All rights reserved. A new format for The Ash Grove list! Hope you like it. Our mailing address is: Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove 882 Cleveland St. #21 Oakland, CA 94606 USA Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp http://www.mailchimp.com/monkey-rewards/?utm_source=freemium_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=monkey_rewards&aid=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&afl=1 ** follow on Twitter (Twitter Account not yet Authorized ) ** friend on Facebook (# ) ** forward to a friend (http://us7.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=e79b3cf159&e=4f9ed2a7d1) ** unsubscribe from this list (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1&c=e79b3cf159) ** update subscription preferences (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage.com/profile?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1)

The Ash Grove: Andy Borowitz: Americans Safe From Gun Violence, Except…, & The Get Lit Players

———————————————————— http://us7.campaign-archive2.com/?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=22c1d46876&e=4f9ed2a7d1 The Ash Grove Andy Borowitz: Americans Safe From Gun Violence, Except…, & The Get Lit Players http://readersupportednews.org/opinion2/436-2nd-amendment-rights/20303-study-americans-safe-from-gun-violence-except-in-schools-malls-airports-movie-theatres-workplaces-streets-own-homes ** Study: Americans Safe From Gun Violence Except in Schools, Malls, Airports, Movie Theatres, Workplaces, Streets, Own Homes ———————————————————— By Andy Borowitz, The New Yorker 07 November 13 Andy Borowitz is an American comedian and New York Times-bestselling author who satirizes the news for his column, “The Borowitz Report.” A new study released today indicates that Americans are safe from the threat of gun violence except in schools, malls, airports, movie theatres, workplaces, streets, and their own homes. Also: highways, turnpikes, libraries, places of worship, parks, universities, restaurants, post offices, and cars. Plus: driveways, garages, gyms, stores, military bases-and a host of other buildings, structures, and sites. National Rifle Association C.E.O. Wayne LaPierre applauded the study, saying that it reinforced his organization’s long-held position that the United States does not need additional gun laws. “This study makes it abundantly clear that Americans are in no danger of gun violence except in these isolated four hundred and thirteen places,” he said. He added that he hoped that the study would spark a conversation “about the root cause of mass shootings: people who recklessly show up at places where they could be shot at.” * * * GET LIT HOSTS EXTRAORDINARY EVENING OF PERFORMANCE AND POETRY WITH CHEECH MARIN, NED COLLETTI, AND THE GET LIT PLAYERS Event Will Benefit Over 10,000 Teens By Supporting Literacy Programs at Inner City Los Angeles Schools Sunday, November 17 LOS ANGELES, Calif. – October 21, 2013 – Get Lit, a leading non-profit presenter of literary performance, education, and poetry programs that affects the lives of over 15,000 teens each year, is hosting an extraordinary evening of poetry and performance to benefit literacy programs at underserved inner city high schools. The event will occur on Sunday, November 17, 2013 from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the Stadium Club at Dodger Stadium, 1000 Elysian Park Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90012. The exciting evening of entertainment and festivities will feature a special performance by Cheech Marin; a live auction conducted by Dodgers’ General Manager Nick Colletti with exclusive prizes including field level seats to a Dodgers game of choice, passes to the Prime Ticket Baseline Box Club for dinner, field visits during batting practice, and the opportunity to throw the first pitch of a game next season; and a slam poetry performance by award-winning teen poets, the Get Lit Players. Guests will also enjoy a grand buffet dinner created by executive chef Jason Tingley. Diane Lane started Get Lit in 2006. She was inspired by Chicano poet Jimmy Santiago Baca, who learned to read and write in maximum security prison and whom Lane played in a one person show (“Deep Sea Diving”) she wrote and performed. Lane eventually opened for Baca at detention centers, universities, and high schools across the American southwest. After receiving tremendous response and requests from students and teachers alike, Lane put together the Get Lit curriculum and started the program at multiple high schools in Los Angeles. “This evening of entertainment is an awe-inspiring one as we honor Cheech Marin, a great supporter of the arts and a hero to the young people in Los Angeles whom we serve and who aspire to great things,” says Diane Luby Lane, founder of Get Lit. “There is no better way to enjoy outstanding performances, experience transformative poetry and literature, and to give back to the community at the same time,” she added. General tickets to the event are $125 per person and $200 for VIP tickets, which include free parking, program recognition, and premiere seating. To learn more about the benefit event or Get Lit, please contact Jeannine Jacobi at (310) 857-6994 or jeannine@freshpr.net, call the ticket hotline at (310) 962-6696, or visit http://getlit.org. About Get Lit – Words Ignite Founded in 2006 in Los Angeles, Get Lit is a leading non-profit presenter of literary performance, education, and teen poetry programs. Get Lit uses the memorization and recitation of classic poetry as a launch pad for teen-created spoken word responses, fusing the two forms of expression into compelling performances, conducted by teens in school, after school, and through the organization’s own select group of Get Lit Players. These poet ambassadors from throughout Los Angeles perform both classic and spoken word poetry, inspiring fellow teens to read, write, participate in the arts, and be leaders in their community. Each year, Get Lit reaches over 15,000 at-risk teens in more than 45 high schools, turning students into motivated scholars inspired to stay in school and thrive. Learn more at http://getlit.org (http://getlit.org/) or check out video link http://www.youtube.com/user/glwordsignite?blend=1&ob=5. ### ============================================================ Copyright © 2013 Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove, All rights reserved. A new format for The Ash Grove list! Hope you like it. Our mailing address is: Ed Pearl- The Ash Grove 882 Cleveland St. #21 Oakland, CA 94606 USA Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp http://www.mailchimp.com/monkey-rewards/?utm_source=freemium_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=monkey_rewards&aid=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&afl=1 ** follow on Twitter (Twitter Account not yet Authorized ) ** friend on Facebook (# ) ** forward to a friend (http://us7.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=22c1d46876&e=4f9ed2a7d1) ** unsubscribe from this list (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1&c=22c1d46876) ** update subscription preferences (http://edpearl-ashgrove.us7.list-manage.com/profile?u=6e49d094cce3022a65cbe3028&id=6c47b18f94&e=4f9ed2a7d1)